Using a Pizza Stone

You don’t need to wait at the front door for delicious pizza to be delivered at home. Get out in the backyard and grill it yourself!

Grilled pizza is the only way to go and using a pizza stone makes it easy. Grilling pizza provides you with an added smoky flavor that is unmatched by any oven. The stone also is your answer for the crispy crust everyone loves because it absorbs moisture while cooking. 

Grilling pizzas is a favorite for those grilling for a crowd because it allows for each guest to have their own personalized creation, ensuring everyone gets exactly what they want. 

Watch this video for the fundamentals of using a pizza stone, and get ready to grill your own. You’ll be biting into the perfect piece in no time!
 

Get more pizza inspiration here

What are your thoughts? (18)

06.16.16

Ekan T

Question? I have a Weber Spirit 210 with a 3-part grate. I have the pizza insert, but would like to use a larger pizza stone. The grill size is about 20 1/2 inches by 17 1/2 inches. What is the largest pizza stone I could use without problems. How much room around the edges is necessary for hot air circulation, if any?

06.16.16

Kevin Kolman

Ekan
You can use a larger pizza stone. I am not aware of any that would directly cover the entire cooking grate. It would be a safety issue using a stone that completely covered the entire cooking area. Anything bigger then the insert just place the stone on top of the grates. If you need any more help you can find us here or on Facebook and Twitter at Kevin Kolman’s backyard and always Happy Grilling!

05.29.16

Jor D

To get a New York pizzeria style crust I roll my dough (or stretch it) thin. I then fire up my Genesis and a thick pizza stone to close to 600 degrees. Put a generous amount of corn meal on the pizza peel for transfer. Cook with top down for only a minute and a half. Check bottom of crust for doneness. Be careful though. If leave on more than 2 minutes bottom may burn.

03.24.16

Amol P

above comment says this will work in any weber grill. Please note it does not work on Q1200. The stone is too big. I was fortunate to find somebody that cut it

03.24.16

Kevin Kolman

You're right! Thanks for catching that! We appreciate the feedback and have updated the blog. Hopefully you are enjoying your pizza stone. If you need any tips and tricks we are always here to help and always Happy Grilling!!

01.28.16

Louw v

Hi Kevin

I am a Weber Q convert. Cannot live without it. Just moved from Australia to San Jose. Chose an apartment that allowed a Weber Q on the balcony. Weber Q 3200 was on my first shopping list.

Question:
Can I use the Weber Stone on the Q?

01.28.16

Jennie Lussow

Hi Louw! Yes, you can use the Weber pizza stone on the Q3200. I hope you're enjoying your Q 3200!

12.10.15

Jim L

How about us ion a spirit 2 burner grill?

12.09.15

Kevin Kolman

Jim,
Using a two burner gas grill is no problem. The key to using the stone is preheating it correctly. Place the stone directly in the center of the grill. Preheat and away you go!! Hope this helps and if you need any more advice, you can find us here or on Facebook and Twitter at Kevin Kolman’s Backyard. Happy Grilling!!

07.22.15

Barry F

It's still not cear. On a gas BBQ do I use the pizza stone over direct heat or indirect?

07.22.15

Kevin Kolman

Barry,
Over direct medium heat. Preheat for at least 25-30 minutes. What I have done is raise the heat on the outside burners and keep the heat directly under the pizza stone a little lower. This has helped with not overcooking the bottom of the pizza. Keep me posted and grate question. If you have any others you can find us here or on Facebook and Twitter at Kevin Kolman’s backyard and always Happy Grilling!!

07.21.15

Barry F

Doesn't actually answer the question 'direct or indirect heat?'

07.21.15

Kevin Kolman

HI Barry! You will want to cook over direct medium heat. Preheat for at least 25-30 minutes. What I have done is raise the heat on the outside burners and keep the heat directly under the pizza stone a little lower. This has helped with not overcooking the bottom of the pizza. Keep me posted and grate question. If you have any others you can find us here or on Facebook and Twitter at Kevin Kolman’s backyard and always Happy Grilling!!

06.07.15

Mark B

Kevin,
Was wandering if you have a dough recipe you would like to share. Thanks

06.07.15

Kevin Kolman

Here you go!

1 package of active dry yeast
1 tsp white sugar
1 cup water (warm)
3 cups white flour
1 1/2 tbsp olive oil
1/2 tsp salt

Hope this helps and if you need any more help you can find us here or on Facebook and Twitter at Kevin’s Backyard and always Happy Grilling!

05.31.15

Gail C

As a Food Network Pizza winner, I am anxious to trying cooking on this system tonight. There are a few things in this video that need correction, the pizza stone should heat up for at least 45 minutes before using it, also the temperature of the kettle should be between 450 and 500 degrees. Adding oak wood to the fire helps to achieve this temperature. When creating your pizza, you build the pizza on a peel that has been dusted with cornmeal for easy sliding onto the hot stone. The order of building your pizza should be sauce, cheese then topping finishing with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil. The pizza should also be rotated ½ though the cooking process and shouldn't take any longer than 8 minutes to cook. Check out my blog for my award winning recipes...http://foodsinthefastlane.me/2013/07/29/grilling-pizza/

05.31.15

Kevin Kolman

Gail,
Thanks for the tips on the pizza. Sounds like you are very well versed. I think we have some common ground on grilling the pizza. Look forward to trying out your methodology. I will give you my feedback soon! Thanks for stoping in and Happy Grilling!!

05.29.15

Ed B

A couple of thoughts and some techniques I've picked up / developed in the 10 years I've been grilling pizza in the back yard. Take 'em, leave 'em find what works for you, etc.

1. Get one or more pizza peels. These are very handy to help transfer your pizza to and from the stone a little easier than is depicted in the video. You can find them in places like Bed, Bath and Beyond or places that carry kitchenware. The trick is to put the corn meal on the peel first and use that as your prep surface. And you want to use enough of it so none of the dough sticks while sliding it off to the stone.

2. If you have a favorite pizza place in town, ask if you can buy the dough from them. You may find it a lot more tasty than Pillsbury's offering but it's all a matter of what you like. For me, it's very convenient to just go and buy it from shop and then let it rise on my counter for an hour or so. This is especially true if you're having friends over and you are looking to make a lot of pizzas. Chances are the shop won't hassle you. If they ask what you're making, tell them stuffed breads or something so they don't feel like you're trying to avoid paying 18 bucks for a pizza. My shop charges me $1.50 for a large dough.

3. By having more than one peel, you can use the second one to prep the next pizza in line. Simply alternate like this: peel 1 and 2 are used to prep. Peel one is used to put the first pizza on the stone, turn the pizza (if you learn you have a hot spot) and to remove the pizza. Peel two will then be used for the second pizza. While the second one is cooking, use peel one again to prep your third pizza and so on. Or you could use one peel. You'll just have to wait for the first pizza to come off the grill before you can use it to prep the next one. Your choice. I just find it faster especially when I'm cooking a lotta pies for friends and family as it helps keep things moving.

4. The trick to getting the pizza off the peel and onto the stone (aside from using enough corn meal on the peel) is to shuffle the peel gently when you're ready to move the uncooked pizza onto the stone. This way you know for sure it's going to slide off with no issues. Tilt the peel starting at the edge of the stone furthest away from you and shimmy it back toward you so the pizza slides off and lands safely and completely within the boundaries of the stone. This way you avoid burnt edges and it won't bunch up on you like it kinda did in the video.

5. Get to know how your grill cooks as you don't want to keep looking at the pizza or you will lose your heat. Find the best temp for you and then figure out your timing. This may take a few tries but you want to keep that lid down as much as possible.

I'm still searching for the perfect mozz. There's supposed to be a great cheese supplier open to the public in my state but it's over an hour away so one day I'll take the leap. I'm just not satisfied with what I find in the supermarkets. And some day I hope to find my own recipe for dough. Once I get these figured out, who knows... maybe I'll quit the corporate rat race and open up my own little shop.

Good luck to all of you out there. Don't give up on grilling pizza. Once you figure out the process that works best for you, people will be asking when your next pizza party is.

Cheers!

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