How to Cook Your Meat

How to Cook Your Meat

It is an old family story that my great aunt cooked the turkey until the legs turned black. Then she knew it was done. While this may be an interesting visual aid, it is hardly necessary with a timer and a meat thermometer. The meat is also more likely to be moist and flavorful well before the legs turn black.

Fortunately Weber® has the perfect Grilling Guides to help you, whether you’re cooking on a gas grill, charcoal grill, smoker, electric grill, or Weber Q® there is a guide in this pdf for you! (Grilling Guides)

The first step is to decide if your meat should be grilled by the direct method or the indirect method. (Direct/Indirect Grilling Methods)
Use the direct method for fairly flat foods like steaks, fish fillets, boneless chicken pieces, or vegetables. The trick is to turn only once halfway through cooking time.
Use the indirect method for larger cuts of meat like roasts, whole poultry, bone-in poultry pieces, whole fish, and thicker cuts of meat.
Before carving larger cuts of meat, let them rest for 5 to 10 minutes, allowing the internal temperature to rise an additional 5° to 10°F.

After you’ve made your game plan, readied the grill, decided on a cooking method, and preheated for approximately 15 minutes, it’s time to figure out the approximate cooking time.

Basically the thickness or weight of the type of meat, seafood, or vegetable you plan to grill will determine the approximate total grilling time. For instance, if you’re grilling a porterhouse steak that is ¾-inch thick directly over hot charcoal, your total cooking time will be 6 to 8 minutes. Since you’re only to turn the meat once, set the timer for 3 minutes, turn the steak, close the lid, and remove the steak after 6 to 8 minutes. And of course let it rest so the juices stay in the steak instead of on your carving board.

If the menu calls for Baby Back ribs, your grill should be set for indirect cooking with a 300°F to 350°F medium heat. The gas grill center burner should be off to moderate the heat, or your charcoal grill will have the ashed-over charcoal separated leaving an empty area in the middle. Your 3 to 4 pounds of spareribs will cook for approximately 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Check to make sure you have enough LP gas or enough charcoal to add the second hour.

An instant-read thermometer is helpful to gauge the internal temperature of thicker cuts of meat.

You have what you need, so GRILL IT NOW!
 

What are your thoughts? (5)

05.05.13

Kimmi L

Hi Kevin! We just purchased a Weber Summit 600 Gas Grill. We do not see anything on your blog or in the published grilling tips about using the rotisserie. Specifically, we are interested in cooking times for various meats on the rotisserie (today it is a 4 pound pork butt roast). Also, what burners do we activate?

05.05.13

Kevin Kolman

Hi Kimmie,


Congratulations on the new Summit. You have one impressive machine there!


Here is a link to the blog on rotisserie grilling: http://www.weber.com/blog/single/rotisserie-grilling-gas-and-charcoal


There you will find the steps to follow when using the rotisserie. Cooking times for foods are the same when they are placed on a rotisserie. So, if a recipe calls for a roast to take two hours, putting it on the rotisserie will take the same amount of time. Also, when using the rotisserie, place a large drip pan directly under the food to catch the drippings. This will help keep the grill clean.


If you have a rotisserie burner, you should only use it for 20-25 minutes to brown the outside of your food. It should be turned off after that. The grill should be set up for indirect cooking, meaning the far left burner and the far right burner should be set to medium. The rest of the burners should be turned to off.


Let me know if you have any other questions.


Happy Grilling!
-Kevin

03.14.13

julie w

Hi Kevin,


I own an original Genesis BBQ gas grill and I would love to try cooking pizzas, biscuits, cakes etc. on this golden olden. I have no problems using my kettle but with this gas BBQ, I am not quite sure how to set temperatures for different methods of cooking roasts, or slow cooking stockpot style. I notice the thermometer but am not sure if this is to define the temperature of the BBQ or meant to be a thermometer to test if meat, etc. is cooked. Please help!


Love your site,


-Julie Adelaide, South Australia. 

03.14.13

Kevin Kolman

Hello Julie,
Wow, all the way from down under! I?m glad to see you stop in and that you like the site. First, the temperature gauge on our history making Genesis is a dual-purpose thermometer. This means you can tell the grill temperature by the larger numbers on the outside of the thermometer and also tell the meat temperature by the red numbers on the inside of the thermometer. You can do it all including: pizza biscuits, cakes, pie, cookies and anything else that needs baking by setting up your grill for indirect cooking. This is easy to do. Just turn your front and back burners to a medium or low heat and your middle burner to completely off. This will give you a perfect temperature for baking.

Now if you want to do traditional crock pot slow roasting, you can also accomplish this on your grill in two ways. First, turn your front and back burners on low and your middle burner to the off position. Then, turn your front burner to the medium or low position, depending on desired temperature, and keep the middle and back burner off. Truly anything you can do inside your home oven, you can do on your grill. Hopefully this helps and if you need anything else, please let me know.

Happy Grilling!
-Kevin

03.06.13

Mike M

Kevin, from your January entry:
Charcoal lovers should always be prepared with extra briquettes in cold weather. Grilling time may need to be extended or the grill may need a little extra fuel to reach the right temperature, so add briquettes when necessary. Gas grillers have it a little easier, but just remember to position the grill at a 90 degree to the wind. This will help control the temperature inside the grill even throughout gusty cooking hours.


Through freezing temperatures and high winds, your Weber grill still knows how to get the job done, so be patient even if it's taking a little longer in cold weather. Winter temperatures aside, it's always a good idea to use a meat thermometer to make sure you food is grilled properly and to perfection.

03.06.13

Kevin Kolman

Hi MikeMcBride,


I’m glad to see that you’re doing your research as a fellow barbecuer. Keep up the good work! However, I still stand by using the "grilling guides" provided with your gas grill as a baseline. Although, I would always recommend using a meat thermometer to ensure you are taking your food off the grill at a safe temperature, following the grilling guides will help provide you the best grilled food possible. Please know that we test our grills in all types of climates and weather conditions and from that data, we compile the grilling guides. Here are a few other tips to remember when grilling. A good practice, no matter what you are grilling, is to make sure you preheat properly. Also, the more you keep the lid closed, the faster you will cook your food. If you constantly open the lid to check meat temperatures, your food will take too long to grill and become dried out. In the end preheating your grill properly and following the grilling guides will keep you on the right track. Again, use a thermometer to check you’re your food is coming off the grill at a safe temperature.


Happy Grilling!
-Kevin

03.06.13

Mike M

I don't agree with the linked "Grilling Guides". You need to go by the internal temperature of the meat! I mean there are sooo many variables involved, you can't just go by time. The time of grilling outside at 85 F ambient temperature and the time it takes to cook at 35 F ambient temperature is going to yield a different internal temperature, so you can't count on only time as your guide. That pork or chicken you just cooked by your kitchen timer may come back to haunt you after the dishes are cleared off the table.

03.05.13

Barry F

It is almost time to BBQ here in NJ