Rotisserie Prime Rib

A rotisserie is not just for whole chickens. There are many things you can grill to perfection with its help. From turkeys to roasts and everything in between, try it out to see what a difference it can make. Check out this video to learn how to utilize the rotisserie for a prime rib. Once you taste the end result, you’ll be planning what to cook on it next! 

What are your thoughts? (8)

08.30.16

Barry V

Kevin -
Just like the previous post from JOANNA, I don't have an IR burner. But I DO have a weber rotisserie and would love to give this a shot. Unfortunately in your response to joanna, you talk about how she should use the IR burner that she doesn't have which won't really help me. For the grills that don't have IR, how would you adjust to get the best outcome? Thanks!

08.30.16

Kevin Kolman

Barry,
As long as you keep temps around 275-300 you will form an amazing crust without having an IR burner. The key is cooking temperature. Any lower you will have a hard time getting the beautiful crust needed for a perfectly cooked prime rib. Keep the questions coming here or on Facebook and Twitter at Kevin Kolman’s backyard and always Happy Grilling!

06.20.16

Joanna T

Planning on cooking a 15lb bone-in prime rib on the rotisserie for my dad's 79th birthday this coming weekend! I don't have the IR feature on my Weber's grill...
Tips and suggestions? HOw long will have to cook it for? I'm worried i'm going to ruin it!!

06.20.16

Kevin Kolman

Joanna,
We will ensure you will knock this one out of the park. I would recommend using the IR burner towards the end of the cook, maybe 10-15 minutes before you take it off the grill. The reason why I say that is because the roast might look perfect without you using the IR burner and I would hate for you to overcook the outside of that prime rib roast. I would recommend 300-325 for 10-12 minutes per pound. Estimate about 3-3.5 hours of cook time and that is at a medium rare roast. I would recommend going 3 hours and checking for doneness about 125-130. Once there I would then turn on the IR burner if the outside doesn’t have nice color and crust to it. If it does I would then take it off and let rest for 15-20 minutes. This will take the roast up another 5-7 degrees while it rests. Keep us posted here or on Facebook and Twitter at Kevin Kolman’s Backyard and always Happy Grilling!!

04.14.16

abdul z

Hi, Kevin.

I've always wondered about the infrared rotisserie burner. I use mine regularly but struggle to maintain my temperature at that 350º range. I set up the grill for indirect heat with the two outside burners on, two middle ones off. Once that's done am I supposed to keep those two outside burners on while using the infrared rotisserie burner for the first 15 minutes? My grill temp spikes when all three are on.

Thanks for the great video!
-Abdul

04.13.16

Kevin Kolman

Hi Abdul! Keep the outside burners set to low while the IR burner is on, but if the temperature of the grill spikes too much you can always turn one or both of the side burners off. Grill on! - Kevin

05.16.15

Bruce F

I'm looking to buy a Weber Grill. which one would be right for me? Will the Genesis 330 caramelize food on an rotisserie or do you need to upgrade to the Summit 470

03.29.15

Christine O

Kevin, can you add video on how you trussed that guy up with the butcher's twine?

03.29.15

Kevin Kolman

Christine,
We will try to get something in the works. Thanks for the feedback and always Happy Grilling!!!

03.29.15

Christine O

Hi Kevin, I wished you cut into that bad boy at the end! We love our rotisserie for chicken, but I'm so nervous to commit to a prime rib. We normally sear ours in a pan and then slow roast at 225 degrees until it's perfectly medium rare throughout -- edge to edge. I'm afraid we'll overcook on the rotisserie? Any advice? Can we roast at a lower temp?

03.29.15

Kevin Kolman

Christine,
There is no difference from grilling it then your approach. Temperature and time are temperature and time. The big difference is the prime rib will have way, way, way more flavor. One thing to remember is that meat is 70-75 percent water so larger cuts that are slow roasted will hold more moisture. One thing I would try is searing it at the end, this is also known as the reverse sear. Meat will contract at higher temps, pushing out some moisture but searing it at the end will help stop that from happening. If you are nervous about overcooking, then make sure you set your temps correctly and also your timer. If you get nervous you can always stop the rotisserie and check the internal temp with a thermometer. Hope this helps if you need extra advice you can find me at Kevin’s backyard on Facebook and Twitter and always Happy Grilling!!

12.16.14

Sean M

Hi Kevin,

I am interested in cooking a prime rib for some family. I I have a Genesis 300 series grill without an IR setup. What steps would be different than the video?

12.16.14

Kevin Kolman

Sean,
I think your family is going to be really happy when they find out what you are going to be doing. The steps are preheat your grill then turn it down to indirect heat. If I was doing the prime rib I would use a roast holder to keep the food off the grates. This is not a must have but a really nice to have. You can put the roast holder inside a large drip pan which does a good job of catching the juices and keeping your grill clean. You can then use the drippings for a nice light gravy or au jus. If not put the prime rib directly on the grates, get that lid closed and let the grilling begin. Roast the prime rib at 275-300 and you should be good. Please keep me posted and if you need any advice before, during or after let me know on Facebook and Twitter at Kevin’s backyard. Hope this helps and Happy Grilling.

11.01.14

Soheil A

I am planning on using the rotisserie to cook a turkey for Thanksgiving. I have a Genesis 330.
Are the following steps correct?

1. Remove the cooking grates.
2. Preheat the grill to 500 degrees for 10 minutes
3. Lower the heat to medium for the outside burners and turn off the middle burner.
4. Place a foil pan over the Flavorizer bars.
5. Cooking time is 13 minutes per pound.

11.01.14

Kevin Kolman

Hi Soheil,

Your steps are correct. Here are a couple other tips to help you out.

1. Make sure you truss the turkey before you place it on the rotisserie spit. This will help it rotate smoothly throughout the cooking process.
2. Set the burner in the middle somewhere between medium and low. You want to maintain a temperature around 325-350.
3. Try placing two foil pans on the Flavorizer bars for added stability.
4. Try aiming for more like 11 minutes per pound.

I hope all of this helps. Enjoy your turkey!

Happy Grilling!
-Kevin

×

Grill Overview