Perfectly Smoked Pork Shoulder

You can include pulled pork in just about any dish to make it more mouth-watering. Whether you add some to your morning omelet, sprinkle some inside your grilled quesadilla, or top your nachos with it, you can’t go wrong. The great thing about smoking a pork shoulder is that you’re guaranteed a large quantity of food to use in all these various dishes. This video outlines the essential steps that will guarantee your pork shoulder is smoked perfectly, promising many tasty meals for you to enjoy!

What are your thoughts? (10)

11.14.14

Timothy M

Kevin,

I am an American living and smoking in the middle east. I love pulled pork but as you probably know we cant get that here.

Don't roll your eyes... Camel is a common meat here and it is very good. This meat is very close to the consistency of pork but it is a very lean meat. Is there a method of cooking a lean meat like this and still having similar results as you have had here?

11.13.14

Kevin Kolman

Hi Timothy,

You have an interesting story here with smoking camel! The trick to a lean meat like that is to go low and slow. This will keep moisture in rather than pushing it out which can be caused by direct medium to high heat. Also, make sure you use a water pan for added smoke flavor. Keep me posted on how it turns out!

Happy Grilling!
-Kevin

11.06.14

Tom W

I'm from NC and wrapping a pork butt would be sacrileges. We want the bark to be hard so it can contrast to the soft meat of the rest of the butt. It is only about a 1/4" thick, but comprises such an addition you can't imagine.

Never foil a butt for true pulled pork. If you want smoked pork, foil it at 180 and let it carry over cooking to take it to 190.

11.05.14

Kevin Kolman

Hi Tom,

One of the fun parts of barbecue is the debate and the many different ways people smoke, barbecue, and grill their foods. There are times I do not foil, but overall I find when I do, the food is more moist, tender, and never tough. With meat being 70-75 percent water, not having it in foil or a foil pan when it hits the stall makes me a little nervous. The stall occurs usually around 150-160 degrees. You end up losing a lot of flavor to the grill and I love that flavor. I use the drippings to add back into the meat and other dishes I serve. I do like a nice dark bark, but I just don’t want to lose out on that smoked fat and flavor. What kind of sauce do you mix in? A vinegar base? Thanks for the debate!

Happy Grilling!
-Kevin

07.03.14

Yvonne J

I just bought a smoker and will be using it this weekend. From your video I can't tell how often I'm supposed to open lid to check internal temperature of meat. Can you advise.

07.03.14

Kevin Kolman

Hi Yvonne,
Congratulations on the new smoker. When it’s done right, smoking can provide some of the most delicious meals, but it does take a lot of practice. What I recommend doing is setting up the smoker and then letting it go for 4-5 hours. After that time period, I would check the temperature of the meat. I would then check again at the 7-8 hour mark if your meat needs to be on that long. Weber does sell a wireless thermometer that will tell you what the temperature of the meat is without opening the lid, so I suggest you invest in one of those for ease of use. I hope this helps. Enjoy that smoker!
Happy Grilling!
-Kevin

10.28.13

Chris D

Hello Kevin:

Any tips for smoking the pork butt using the rotissiere attachment for my Genesis 330?

10.28.13

Kevin Kolman

Hello Chris,

First, make sure you take the grates out of the grill. Then, remember to place a large drip pan directly under the meat to collect the drippings. Something to watch for is when the shoulder gets up to 160-170 degrees. Pay attention then because the more tender the shoulder gets, the more it will begin to fall apart. I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any other questions.

Happy Grilling!
-Kevin

08.19.13

David K

I have a brand new Weber EP 330. Can I smoke this pork shoulder using the method above, or is a smoker necessary?

07.07.13

Roger R

I have the larger smoker arriving tomorrow. I've read that the thermometer on the dome is not very accurate on the smoking surface, and only reads the temperature for the top of the dome. Is there another thermometer I can purchase that will accurately give me the actual temp on the smoking surface? I'm going off of comments found on Lowes and Home Depot's sites. Thanks, Don

06.03.13

Ryan S

Kevin-
Do you add any liquid when you wrap the pork butt in foil?

Thanks,
Ryan

06.03.13

Kevin Kolman

Hi Ryan,

Yes. At times I do add some liquid to the pork when I foil it. I have used bourbon, apple juice, and beer. I think these all add flavor which is great. However, if you do the pork butt correctly, you should not need liquid for moisture purposes. Let me know if you have any other questions.

Happy Grilling!
-Kevin

05.25.13

Steve B

How do you check the internal temp after it's been foil wrapped? Unwrap a portion, or poke thru the foil?

05.22.13

Phil S

When it comes time to wrap the pork butt while it is still cooking, I put it in a foil pan with 1/2 beer (preferably Shiner Bock) and then tent it. When the pork reaches the temp, I take it out and let it rest in the pan for about 1 hour. Then I pull the pork and the drippings into ice cube trays and freeze them. They make wonderful additions to pan sauces.

05.22.13

Kevin Kolman

Hi Phil,

I appreciate you sharing the tip. I am going to try your method the next time I do pork shoulder. It sounds amazing and I have a few beers I am looking forward to trying this with.

Happy Grilling!
-Kevin

05.22.13

Robert T

I've smoked hundreds of pounds of pork shoulder, but never foiled it until I took it off at 195. Never rubbed it down until 1-2 hours prior. I'm going to try your method! Always up for the challenge...